Virginia Environmental News Roundup for March 2021

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for March 2021

Energy

report from UVA’s Weldon Cooper Center describes ways to accelerate Virginia’s transition away from carbon-source fuels toward clean energy. Not everyone believes these are feasible solutions. Powhatan County approved a 20 MW solar farm. A Harrisonburg resident leads Give Solar, which will help Habitat for Humanity install solar on several area homes in 2021.

In its first Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) auction, Virginia netted $43+ million, part of which will fund energy efficiency programs for low income Virginians. RFFI is a multi-state coalition to reduce carbon pollution. Multiple Virginia energy groups want Congress to pass “Biden’s 100 % Clean Electricity Standard Now.” Virginia Tech’s board wants a carbon neutral campus by 2030.

Dominion faces a challenge getting onto the grid the electricity from the 188 wind turbines it’s building off Virginia’s coast. Another challenge is receiving needed approvals from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. A for-profit school in Norfolk is training students for wind industry jobs. Virginia continues to “scope out” opportunities for becoming a player in the wind industry supply chain.

A southwest Virginia group is beginning the process of adding more residential solar in coalfield areasFive localities there are cooperating to attract more data centersNew rail service in the New River Valley may become reality after 2021 legislation to enable fundraising. A former coal mining equipment manufacturer has pivoted to energy storage, with help from a grant.

Taking its first steps to join the EV bandwagon, Virginia enacted clean car standards comparable to those in California and established an as-yet unfunded rebate process to incentivize Virginians to purchase EVs. Six utilities are cooperating to greatly expand EV charging stations throughout the southeast, mid-west, and Atlantic destinations; Dominion is one of the participants.

Dominion wants approval to continue operation of its North Anna nuclear plant for another 20 years. Opponents question its safety after the 2011 earthquake.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) remains a source of news: It will be completed this year. Arguments in a court case that it’s not needed failed. Work continues while tree-sitters watchOne sitter was removedA second sitter was removed, effectively ending that protest. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy received a $19.5 million pledge from MVP, with which it signed a 2020 voluntary conservation agreement.” Owners of the Transco Pipeline filed suit against MVP owners who want to take land through eminent domain that Transco previously acquired the same way.

Pittsylvania’s NAACP asked Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality to have the Air Quality Control Board review MVP’s air permit. Builders of a proposed natural gas pipeline in Prince William County withdrew its application. Despite vocal community opposition to a Wegman’s distribution center in a wetlands area, the Virginia Water Control Board approved its construction.

Climate and Environment

Southwest Virginia has a huge gypsy moth problem but may have found a way to address it.

Northern Virginia tap water may have high levels of “forever chemicals.” The James River has a pollution problem despite past and current efforts to solve it.

Virginia saw some environmental “wins” during the 2021 General Assembly session. Prince William County is considering whether to establish a “plastic bag tax.”

Virginia Beach will restore 200+ acres of wetlands to help reduce flooding. Virginia contracted with an engineering firm to receive a “roadmap” for responding to the threats from sea level rise and coastal flooding.

Several EMU students organized a summer 2021 “Climate Ride” to “get folks interested in saving the world.” An EMU alumna is airborne to study air quality, “measuring aerosols and greenhouse gases by plane.”

Get ready for the 17-year cicadas; they’re coming our way. As you may have noticed, spring has sprung; seen any bluebirds? Encountered any black bears on your hikes? Virginia’s population is flourishing.

Some “to dos”: Thinking of taking some hikes this spring? Virginia offers some good ones.  An Amherst resident managed to complete her goal along the Appalachian Trail. Hike the newly opened Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel Trail under Afton Mountain; and learn its history. See the importance of the “Goose Creek Watershed” from this documentary. Check out a recent “Fata Morgana” mirage over the Chesapeake Bay, and learn what it is. Tell Harrisonburg Downtown Renaissance what your vision of the city’s 2040 downtown looks like.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup – utility regulation special report

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Editor’s Note: This is a special installment of the periodic contributed news roundups about statewide environmental news. This piece highlights selected utility reform bills that the Virginia General Assembly considered in 2021, with links to further coverage in various media outlets. Future perspectives will cover other important 2021 legislation, about energy, energy efficiency, and other environmental matters.

During 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic, most utility customers enjoyed a moratorium on paying utility bills. Anticipating the lifting of that moratorium, some legislators examined existing state law with a view to identifying and addressing some that favored utilities over consumer. The result was introduction of several bills that, together, would expand the State Corporation Commission’s authority to regulate Virginia’s investor-owned monopoly utilities in a more balanced manner than current law allows. All but one were filed in the House of Delegates.

Although consolidated and modified versions of these bills passed the House, all failed in the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee. Thus, the full Senate never had the opportunity to vote for or against them. The same Senate Commerce and Labor Committee also killed the one bill introduced in that chamber. Below is a table of the major bills and whether our area Delegates and State Senators supported them. Sen. Mark Obenshain (R-Harrisonburg) sits on the Commerce and Labor committee.

Bill No.PurposeDel. WiltDel. GilbertDel. RunionSen. HangerSen. Obenshain
HB 1914Give SCC discretion on counting utility costs against revenuesNoNoNoN/ANo
HB 1984Give SCC added discretion to determine fair rate of return & order rate changesNoNoNoN/ANo
HB 2049Prevent using overearnings for new projects rather than refundingNoNoNoN/ANo
HB 2200Change SCC procedures re setting fair rate of return, crediting 100% overearnings to customers, & eliminating $50M refund limit, starting 2021.YesNoNoN/ANo
HB 2160Give SCC authority to set fair rate of return & require crediting 100% overearnings to customers rather than current 70%NoNoNoN/ANo
SB 1292Require crediting 100% overearnings to customers rather than current 70%N/AN/AN/AN/ANo

As noted in the brief descriptions above, the bills were designed to lower ratepayers’ bills, return excess charges to ratepayers, and give the SCC the ability to set fair ratesAdvocates and bill sponsors, as well as those legislators who supported these bills, took note of the fact that Virginia’s largest monopoly-owned utility—Dominion Energy—had been successful in avoiding periodic SCC review since passage of a 2015 law. After that, it had become obvious that Dominion had overcharged its customers around an estimated $500 million.

A previous General Assembly restored the periodic SCC review, to occur every three years starting 2021. That review will be underway soon when Dominion files the necessary paperwork with the SCC. The promise of the above 2021 bills was to enable the SCC to ensure that such large overcharges would not recur and that any refunds it ordered would in fact go to the overcharged customers. The latter was a priority because of other prior legislation that allowed Dominion to (1) hold onto 30% of any overcharges and return only 70% and (2) make a case that it should keep all overcharges and apply them to the costs of future approved projects.

Despite strong support in the House of Delegates and strong advocacy by many individuals and groups, none of the bills became law. It is likely efforts to achieve these and similar reforms will happen for the 2022 General Assembly session. It might be useful to understand your representatives’ reasons for their votes on this year’s bills.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for February 2021

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for February 2021

So far this year, the Virginia General Assembly has considered many energy, transportation, utility, and land and water conservation bills; the legislature’s regular session ended late last month and the special session ends shortly. CAAV has tracked several of these and will produce a summary that will appear in this space in early March.

Energy

The Mountain Valley Pipeline continues to make headlines–about water permitsopponent activitieslitigationpublic opinion surveys, and operations.

Efforts are underway to “stitch Virginia, Maryland and DC closer together” through a vision of an expanded train network. The economic development organization, GO Virginia, has awarded funding to create jobs in the Tidewater area to address seal level rise. A Virginia representative submitted proposed federal legislation to ban offshore drilling.

Automaker Tesla is moving to add three new dealerships in Virginia. A new battery electrical energy storage facility has been proposed for Southside Virginia. An electrical cooperative and a Charlottesville solar installer teamed to propose a battery storage facility and solar array near Batesville in Albemarle County. There are big plans for offshore wind along Virginia’s coast. Old Dominion Electric Cooperative, which supplies energy to many Virginia electric cooperatives, pledged to be net-zero carbon by 2050. Sigora Solar and Isle of Wight County are partnering to put solar on seven of its nine schools.

Climate and Environment

Humpback whales, and other marine creatures, face many risks as they traverse shipping lanes in and out of the Chesapeake Bay. Ongoing research aims to reduce these dangers. A Shenandoah Valley farmer employs rotational grazing, which provides benefits to her land and, because her farm is in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, also to the Bay. Ducks Unlimited will preserve 1,300 acres in the Great Dismal Swamp by restoring it to wetlands. A Harrisonburg farmer is practicing restorative farming along Blacks Run. Prince William County Supervisors recently approved rules to promote agri-tourismEelgrass is important to the Bay ecosystem; unfortunately it’s in trouble. Thanks to funding from a DuPont settlementShenandoah National Park Trust and partners acquired 900 acres of rolling woodlands in Page County. The Virginia Outdoors Foundation has awarded grants to Buena Vista and Rocky Mount to improve the towns’ parks and to Nelson County to create a new boat landing near the Rockfish River. The Joseph Pines Preserve in Sussex County expanded its conservation easement by 196 acres.

In somewhat stark contrast, efforts to have the General Assembly stop a proposed “mega” landfill in a community of color in Cumberland County failed. As happened in Buckingham County with the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline compressor station, the landfill owners offered relatively small amounts of money to a cash-strapped county so 3,500 tons of waste could come into the county from elsewhere daily. A study funded by the owners showed the county would receive great economic benefits.

As part of efforts to aid Southwest Virginia in its move away from coal, Virginia agencies are assisting farmers to identify and grow new crops, such as barley for craft breweries. The Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy will use a federal grant to help restore abandoned coal mine sites and boost local economic development.

Ever heard of the Carolina Bays? They are in Virginia too. They’re a bit mysterious and may have extraterrestrial origins. Like Applejack? Distillers, including in Virginia, are bringing it back and updating it. A fascinating short film by a father and his 7 year old son, about the dangers of kayaking near a dam in the James River near Richmond, won an award at the recent RVA Environmental Film Festival. A blogger wrote about the Roanoke area’s efforts to re-brand itself as an “outdoors-friendly community.” The Virginia Department of Wildlife and Resources site, Go Outdoors Virginia, offers guidance for safe water use and gives an online way to obtain access licenses. An EMU professor produced a marvelous book, Vernal Pools of Appalachia, available as a free, downloadable e-book. The Throwing Solar Shade project offered high school students a competitive opportunity to offer suggestions for innovations in solar energy.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for January 2021

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for January 2021

Energy

Appalachian Power wants the State Corporation Commission (SCC) to approve a rate increase to cover costs of “environmental improvements” at coal power plants. It also wants SCC approval of transmission line upgrades for five counties. The SCC did approve a service fee of $1.80/month. Dominion Energy wants the SCC to approve raising rates to pay for solar projects. The 2021 General Assembly session happening now will consider numerous energy and environmental bills. Some relate to utility reform.

The General Assembly will be voting on several clean energy and transportation bills during the current session: EVsenergy storagewildlifedata centers, so-called “advanced recycling,” and emissions standards. Local Del. Chris Runion (R-Bridgewater) has partnered with Del. Kathleen Murphy (D-McLean) on a bill to expand the definition of “small solar agricultural generator” to include wineries, cideries, and distilleriesLouisa County now has two electric school buses; Fairfax County has one. In what may be a sign of what’s to come, Giant Food announced installation of an EV charging station at its Purcellville store. Virginia is working with Norfolk Southern to expand passenger rail service in the New River Valley.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline continues to be the focus of federal and state regulators, and protestors. Its future is anybody’s guess; a recent survey indicates it does have supporters. North Carolina’s Department of Environmental Quality approved a permit so Dominion Energy and Smithfield Foods could start using hog waste to produce energy. A Dominion power plant using such material will be in Virginia. Atlantic Coast Pipeline cleanup will happen from 2021-2023 in Virginia, North Carolina, and West Virginia.

Danville’s City Council approved an energy storage project to save the city’s energy costs. Augusta County’s planning commission determined that a proposed solar farm near Stuarts Draft is inconsistent with the comprehensive plan. A guest columnist addressed whether solar panels should be put on food-production land.

Climate and Environment

Eagles are having problems with survival in Virginia; humans are causing them. Mark Viette, a horticulturist, has ideas for helping all birds. The invasive spotted lanternfly will adversely and noticeably affect Virginia agriculture.

The federal EPA continues to clean up a former titanium mine and refinery superfund site in Piney River. The Monacan Indian Nation and the James River Water Authority are working to address the former’s concerns about a controversial water project in Fluvanna County. A new report by a coalition of groups documents efforts in Central Appalachia to clean up and repurpose abandoned coal mine lands.

More than 2,500 acres in Charlotte County are now a state forest. Over 800 acres of old growth forest in Giles and Bland Counties are now protected. An additional 400 acres has been added to the Poor Mountain Natural Area Preserve near Roanoke. Reforest Richmond is a campaign to plant over 8,000 Eastern Redbud saplings to help restore tree canopy. VA GRAZ is modeling software to help Virginia farmers assess potential impacts of conservation and other practices they are considering. Farmers can complete this survey to report on their conservation management efforts. Virginia representatives have proposed that the Historic Dismal Swamp be designated a National Heritage Area. One of these representatives convened the House Chesapeake Bay Advisory Board to consider the Bay’s effects on Virginia’s coastal communities. An article discusses the challenges of protecting species diversity in national forests such as Virginia’s Jefferson because commercial use is often allowed.

Norfolk’s problems with sea level rise and sinking land necessitates planning for dealing with chronic flooding. Stormwater runoff is a big problem.

Here’s a great story about a Chesapeake Bay skipjack skipper, oysters, and history. Chesapeake Bay restoration is an ongoing effort but more progress is needed; Bay advocates hope the Biden administration will be supportive. A Virginia delegate will head the tri-state Bay Commission in 2021. This video describes an intensive job training program to support Virginia’s wind industry. This dashboard lets you monitor Virginia’s progress toward its clean energy goals. Virginia Tech researchers say one way to reduce threats from Asian carp is to eat them. A Floyd County blogger provides some history about native forest bees before honeybees were imported. Biden named the Virginia commissioner of agriculture and consumer services to serve as deputy secretary of agriculture.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for December 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for December 2020

Energy

Pulaski County will host a new Volvo Electric Truck plant. Virginia wants Congress to authorize transferring four acres of National Park land to the Commonwealth to construct a passenger rail bridge across the Potomac River.

Mountain Valley Watch submitted aerial photographs to request State Water Control Board action  addressing bare earth and stream sediment from Mountain Valley Pipeline activities. The same group filed a federal lawsuit objecting to FERC’s allowing the MVP project to move forward. Pipeline projects continue to be proposed.

The State Corporation Commission denied Appalachian Power’s rate increase request; the utility will appeal the decision. In response to a lawsuit, a Federal Judge declined to order removal of Dominion’s controversial transmission line across the James River, ordering an improved Environmental Impact Statement. The Army Corps of Engineers completed the revised draft, because there’s no better alternative; public comment period closes February 21, 2021. Dominion canceled a planned “peaker” power plant in Pittsylvania County. Dominion is acting on its deal with Smithfield Foods to pipe hog waste from North Carolina pig farms to a plant using the “natural gas” to power 4,000 homes. The State Air Quality Control Board approved the Navy’s request to build a steam- and natural-gas-turbine power plant at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, despite significant increases in small‑particulate matter. It will be “near a predominately Black community with higher-than-normal rates of respiratory illnesses.” (“Navy spending accounts for 15% of Hampton Roads economy.”)

The Catholic Diocese of Richmond continues its solar deployment. The Southwest Virginia Coalfields Authority will use its coal tax credits to establish a renewable energy fund. The American Battlefield Trust issued a how-to report on protecting Virginia’s historic sites while meeting clean energy goals. Newport News City Council will decide whether to approve conditional use permits for the City School Board’s contract for solar on the schools.

Off-shore facilities could be powerful economy‑boosters, as described in this video. The Kitty Hawk off‑shore project will bring hundreds of jobs to Hampton Roads.

A series of articles published by the Virginia Mercury explained Virginia’s clean energy transition. A Rocky Mountain Institute report said Virginia Clean Economy Act initiatives are insufficient to meet carbon-reduction goals.

Climate and Environment

Virginia’s Maritime Resources Commission extended 2020’s crab pot season by 20 days, and the shrimp season until January 31, 2021, saying there shouldn’t be a negative effect on the 2021 season. A Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) video highlighted 2020 Bay activities. CBF sold its Fox Island facilities because of sea-level rise. It touted passage of two recent federal bills to boost funding for Bay restoration. The Potomac Conservancy dropped the River’s report card to B- for 2020. Norfolk Shipyard is “turning to oyster ‘castles,’ ‘bergs’ to help clean up the Elizabeth River’s polluted waters.” Virginia has made progress in convincing farmers to fence cattle from Bay watershed streams; Delegate Wilt is proposing a tax credit (HB1652).

This map shows how 2020’s hurricane season affected Virginia. Hampton will fund three projects to “capture, store, redirect and filtrate some 8 million gallons of stormwater” and reduce flooding. Virginia Beach residents are planting trees to slow flooding. A $130 million flooding overhaul for two Norfolk neighborhoods near the Elizabeth River is ahead of schedule. VDOT’s Beautify Virginia project seeks help to pick up road-way litter. Virginia is closer to acquiring land for its 40th state park, Machicomoco, in Gloucester Co. Conservation groups funded acquisition of 600 acres on McAfee’s Knob to preserve views from the Appalachian Trail.

satirical article “connects” fewer coal plants and more wind turbines. This interactive map and story map show how land cover affects water quality, including the Chesapekae Bay.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for November 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for November 2020

Energy

Advocacy group Generation 180 is promoting solar on schools in Virginia. Several Southwest Virginia school systems want solar panels but face obstaclesFairfax County has contracted with multiple companies to provide solar on several government facilities. Danville’s municipal electric utility added more solar to its grid, and a Big Stone Gap business went solar. Several other localities, including Front RoyalPittsylvania CountyCulpeper CountyPulaski CountyAmherst County, and Rockingham County have considered or are considering applications for large solar farms. Dominion Energy says it’s the country’s third‑largest solar-owning utility. A Virginia solar company will build a large solar facility in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Virginia joined its northern and southern neighboring states in a program to spur off‑shore wind development, although a Tangier family of conch fishermen says Dominion’s off-shore wind farm threatens its livelihood. The Botetourt County on-shore wind farm received a “final” approval, but the FAA said, “not so fast”.

A UVA professor says Virginia can de-carbonize by 2050. Virginia is defending a lawsuit challenging the state’s joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a regional carbon “cap‑and-invest” program. Solar World touted the passage of the Virginia Clean Economy Act (VCEA). Appalachian Power said it would comply with the VCEA and become “carbon free by 2050.” Several lawmakers told the State Corporation Commission that proposed energy storage rules violate the VCEA. Dominion will provide E-buses to Chesterfield County schools.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project continues to face legal challenges and public opposition, including long-time tree sitters.

Climate and Environment

Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) reported five “wins”Fewer Bay “dead zones” is another good signHopewell and CBF partnered to plant trees as a riparian buffer near the James and Appomattox Rivers. Several restoration projects, and litigation, concern oyster and shrimp (Elizabeth RiverHampton RoadsVirginia BeachBay tributariesChesapeake Bay) and underwater vegetation (Eastern Shore, Virginia BeachEastern Seaboard). The Chesapeake Bay Commission monitors the Bay’s status. Climate change will make cleanup efforts harder. Plastic is imperiling sea turtles and marine mammals.

derailed coal train spilled coal into the Roanoke River, requiring water testing. Although state environmental funding was supposed to be at record levels in 2020, that’s no longer expected. A new environmental justice study calls for ‘a cultural shift’ at the Department of Environmental Quality.

Virginia Beach ranked 72 of 100 cities in the “2020 City Clean Energy Scorecard.” Sea level rise remains a challenge despite efforts to mitigate it. Virginia is losing salt marshes. Buckingham County residents dodged the Atlantic Coast Pipeline but face open-pit gold mining.

The Blue Ridge Discovery Center will receive DEQ grant money to help transform two brownfields “into a unique Southwest Virginia destination.” Virginians are informed about the climate crisis and have opinions on the need to act. Two Virginia Tech professors are researching the climate change implications for mountainous regions and coastal living. Shenandoah County wants the state to designate part of the North Fork of the Shenandoah River as “scenic.” A new report underscores the economic importance of outdoor recreation to states in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. And the Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority set up a $1 million Renewable Energy Fund.

Also of note:

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for October 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for October 2020

Energy

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approved a two-year extension for completing the Mountain Valley Pipeline’s (MVP), as MVP owners are seeking FERC permission to resume construction. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reissued three permits for an MVP “path across nearly 1,000 streams and wetlands.” Environmental groups have sued over a U.S. Fish & Wildlife service “biological opinion” concerning MVP construction’s impact on endangered species. Previously, FERC approved a 75‑mile MVP extension into North Carolina. It recently denied a request for a re-hearing by pipeline opponents on that approval.

President Trump announced extension of the ban on off-shore drilling along Virginia’s coast through 2032. The Virginia Manufacturer’s Association has sued to keep the state from joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative’s carbon market.

Gov Northam signed legislation funding Virginia’s first zero-emission electric buses in Hampton Roads, while a partnership between Fairfax County & Dominion Energy has created “Virginia’s first publicly funded autonomous electric shuttle pilot project.”

Virginia’s off-shore wind industry could produce 5,000 jobs and $740M in economic impact over the next several years; Dominion’s newly-operational wind farm could provide 1,000 jobs and $209M. Virginia received a federal grant to “support the siting of wind energy projects across the Commonwealth.” A Danish company that supplies the wind energy sector will build a plant in Henrico County. Shenandoah County Supervisors approved a large-scale solar farm near Mt. JacksonAlbemarle Co approved its first climate action plan; supporters want action on municipal solar. A former Navy fuel yard could become the site of a 20-MW solar farm in York County. With help from an area solar developer  and a local roofer, a Waynesboro school recently installed solar panels.

Climate and Environment

Severe flooding in Hampton Roads resulted in overflow of “millions of gallons of sewage during recent heavy rain.” A U.S. Forest Service plan may threaten Lynchburg’s water supply. Staunton’s recent severe flooding didn’t merit federal disaster assistance, but the community is pulling together. Aging wastewater systems in Southwest Virginia represent large expenses for cash-strapped communities.

comparative study of how each state’s public schools science standards address climate change–“Making the Grade”—gave Virginia an “F”, but state officials disagree. A George Mason University survey of Virginia adults showed 78% want news and information about climate impacts.

Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) released its annual air quality report, saying “the state had 34 more ‘good’ air quality days this year than the previous record set in 2017.” Using federal grant money, DEQ will study the effects on air quality of coal dust in Hampton Roads.

Nelson County residents want to work with Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) project owners on environmental restoration of property disturbed by construction prior to ACP cancellation. October marked the 10th anniversary of the Smith Creek Showcase Watershed project. Its purpose: serve as a model for how stream-fencing and grass buffers can reduce run-off into Chesapeake Bay watershed waterways. In early December, Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) will sponsor three days of tree planting on a Staunton farm “to create a forested buffer.” Virginia’s 40th state park, Machicomoco State Park in York County, will open by the end of 2020.

A travel writer visited several southwest Virginia locations that reminded him of the American West. A Southern Environmental Law Center video, “Broken Ground,” tells personal stories about how sea-level rise and sinking land affect lives in coastal communities, including Hampton Roads. “One Minute for Earth” is an Earth Day Every Day video project to encourage citizens to “Vote Earth” on November 3.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for September 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for September 2020

Energy

Three notable solar energy stories in Virginia: Several Richmond-area Catholic churches have installed panels; Rockingham County tabled a solar farm permit application; and the insurance company Anthem has agreed to buy power from a solar energy project nearing completion in Hanover.

The Virginia Clean Economy Act officially became law when the Governor signed it in late August. The business group Virginia Advanced Energy Economy argues that the state can lead on clean energy while maintaining a reliable grid.

The Washington Metro system has installed LED-lighting in 48 stations to improve its energy efficiency. Rappahannock Electric Cooperative will install a grid-sized battery storage system. An Environment America report ranked eight Virginia universities on electric vehicle deployment; JMU came in seventh. Governor Northam signed legislation that will bring zero‑emission electric buses to Hampton Roads.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will decide whether to extend the timeline for completing the Mountain Valley Pipeline. Dominion Energy filed a nuclear license renewal application for the North Anna Power Station. Some Virginia Democratic lawmakers want President Trump to extend a moratorium on offshore oil and gas drilling to Virginia. Meanwhile, Virginia and North Carolina have reached a settlement over the 2014 Dan River spill.

Climate and Environment

A scientific collaboration including Virginia Tech developed a workshop, “Fish and Ships,” to assist researchers worldwide in understanding marine animals and the movements of “commercial fishing vessels, two crucial drivers in the effort to maintain a healthy ocean ecosystem.” The Department of Wildlife Resources has funded six habitat projects to protect endangered species, including the rusty patched bumblebeeSmallmouth bass and menhaden populations are improving, thanks to conservation efforts. The summer brought significant algae blooms to the Chesapeake Bay. Virginia joined other states in suing the EPA over its management of the Bay’s watershed agreement. Bay cleanup efforts have long been underway; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s history of these efforts, starting with the 1972 Clean Water Act, suggest more work is needed.

Some Virginia homeowners are taking action to protect their homes from flooding. Staunton recently experienced significant flooding, with costly results. Dorchester County, Maryland, on the Delmarva Peninsula, is sinking as Chesapeake Bay water levels are rising and flooding is increasing. County officials are considering whether buyouts of some homeowners are a good approach, in contrast to approaches in nearby Norfolk ”to invest in new infrastructure and flood prevention.” Climate Central’s interactive map shows coastal communities’ sea level rise vulnerability to. Hampton Roads’ sinking is visible from space.

Governor Northam wants to study whether Virginia should continue to landfill so much out-of-state trash. He also wants to spend more money rehabilitating aging dams threatened by increased precipitation due to climate change. Two area entities recently won the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award: the Harrisonburg‑Rockingham Sewer Authority and Virginia Clean Cities.

A writer who explores Virginia’s waterways wrote about paddling the Appomattox River, offering a fascinating history and describing many creatures in and around the river. And a local writer says the “Growing Climate Solutions Act gives farmers a seat at the carbon market table.”

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for August 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for August 2020

Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Now that Virginia’s first offshore wind is in operation, a group in Hampton Roads is working to make that area a hub for the east coast wind industry’s supply chain. The idea is to ”position Hampton Roads as a destination for offshore wind companies to invest … creating new economic prospects for existing businesses, attracting new investments to the region and sparking new permanent job creation.” A longtime wind advocate believes “Workforce investment [is] key to wind power project’s success.” Virginia’s offshore wind projects were highlighted in a recent Siemens Gamesa update, and progress continues on a wind project in Botetourt County.

The Port of Virginia will electrify cargo-handling equipment at its facility in Richmond.

There are multiple efforts to bring large-scale solar to different sites in the state, including Culpepersouthwest VirginiaSurry County, and Orange County.

Presidential candidate Joe Biden’s climate plan calling for 100% clean energy by 2035 prompted The Washington Post to analyze how much work remains to meet that goal – including in Virginia, despite recent clean energy legislation and use of nuclear energy.

Pipelines, Coal Mines, Gas Plants, and Utilities

There are concerns that the coal industry’s decline will saddle states like Virginia with massive cleanup costs. The state’s longstanding ban on uranium mining was upheld.

The cancellation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) was a thrilling outcome for those who worked for years to oppose it. Here are a slideshow highlighting their efforts and a recording of the online party; you might recognize some of the faces! It includes the popular song by area singer-songwriters Robin and Linda Williams, with a new final verse acknowledging the outcome. The Southern Environmental Law Center, which filed many legal actions opposing the pipeline, issued a thank-you to those who assisted their efforts. There are concerns about Dominion’s land acquisition for the ACP and what will happen to the land and landowners. Two bloggers have decidedly differing opinions. “A $350 million gas project spanning much of eastern Virginia has been put on hold, in part due to environmental justice concerns.” Questions have arisen about the Mountain Valley Pipeline and its planned extension from Virginia into North Carolina. Will it go forward or not? Virginia legislators are interested in reforming the federal pipeline approval process.

There is controversy about a proposed rate increase for Appalachian Power Co (ApCo) customers in Southwest Virginia. There’s interest in ApCo’s allowing solar installation on schools in that area. Dominion asked the SCC for “interim storage targets” as it moves to implement requirements of the VA Clean Economy Act passed earlier this year as well as its latest Integrated Resource Plan.

Environment

Many Virginians are thrilled with the passage of the Great American Outdoors Act, which the President signed on August 4. The bipartisan bill will provide long-needed funding for national parks in Virginia and elsewhere across the country. Representative Ben Cline voted against the bill. A recent study showed folks are increasingly turning to public parks “for health and recreation” during the pandemic.

Along Virginia’s coast, flooding is widespread and frequent, even occurring on sunny days. The rate of this “nuisance flooding” is accelerating and damaging roads, buildings, and croplands. Tidewater isn’t the only part of the state experiencing flooding. Recent rains have negatively affected Northern Virginia as well as Staunton. A recent study found that “Rising Seas Could Menace Millions Beyond Shorelines”—including here in Virginia.

In our second perspectives piece, we described efforts to save migrating birds after their traditional nesting sites were destroyed because of road construction. It appears those efforts were successful. In that same piece, we noted that the state is focusing on menhaden. These efforts include some by conservation groups as well as the Atlantic Menhaden Advisory Board. Officials are hopeful Virginia’s Wildlife Corridor Plan will reduce risks to humans and animals.

Concerns about air pollution motivated 20 states, including Virginia, to sue the EPA over its easing of mercury pollution standards. Most states—again including Virginia—have “reduced their carbon emissions while growing their economies.” Analysis of all states’ progress in emissions reduction showed Virginia has room for improvement. Staff shortages resulting from a budget shortfall “are making it harder for agencies to respond to sea level rise and other climate change-related issues.”

Seven East Coast states saw their hottest July on record”. Virginia was one. Roanoke is one of 13 cities that are part of a study of urban heat islands effect.

The Chesapeake Conservancy has launched a series of podcasts—“Chesapeake Conversations”—giving information on the Bay’s status. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) built a “jewel” of a green building that produces 83% more energy than it uses. CBF worked with a Clarke County farmer to “install a rotational grazing system, leading to a more productive farm, healthier soil, and cleaner waterways.” CBF also keeps tabs on Bay health — Blue Crabs and Underwater Grasses. There is some not so good news—about PCBs. The Chesapeake Bay program recently gave Virginia mixed reviews. And then there’s the recent algae bloom.

CBF’s Communications Director described the importance of our state’s waterways to our collective health. Virginians who enjoy using the Shenandoah River will have expanded access, thanks to funding from the DuPont-Waynesboro Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration settlement.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.

Virginia Environmental News Roundup for July 2020

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley is pleased to provide Harrisonburg’s The Citizen with a monthly survey of energy and environmental news stories about Virginia.

With their permission, we are re-posting these pieces here after they appear in The Citizen.


The link to this piece as first published by The Citizen is HERE.

Statewide Environmental News Roundup for July 2020

Renewables

Spotswood County will be the site of the largest solar project in the Eastern U.S.; Wells Fargo approved financing for the 620-megawatt project its Utah-based developer first proposed in 2018. Dominion Energy solicited proposals for “up to 1,000 megawatt hours (MWh) of solar and onshore wind generation and up to 250 megawatts of energy storage”. These are part of its latest Integrated Resource Plan (IRP), released after enactment of 2020’s Virginia Clean Economy Act, or VCEA. While the IRP sets out more ambitious targets than its 2019 IRP, critics say the 2020 plan continues to rely too much on fossil fuel sources. The IRP includes storage as well. Wells Fargo stepped up again, financing a Shell subsidiary that plans to install 150,000 MW in California and three Virginia counties.

Secure Futures, a Staunton-based solar company, will add 2 MW to the 1.8 MW of solar panels it installed on county schools in 2019. The company is also adding 2.5 MW to Orange County schools. In Southwestern Virginia, advocates are working to ensure that the 2020 VCEA’s emphasis on solar energy will bring more of it to their area, thereby addressing the urgency for a transition away from coal, as demand has plummeted. The Nature Conservancy wants to partner with someone to develop solar on 13,000 acres of cleared coal mine land in Southwestern Virginia. In the Winchester area, “Solar energy makes local car wash even ‘greener’”. Thanks to 2020 legislation, residential and business property owners have eight new ways to help them go solar. And Fredericksburg’s baseball team, a minor league affiliate of the Washington Nationals, will light their stadium using solar power.

Finally, Virginia now has offshore wind power. Governor Northam signed enabling legislation for wind turbines off the Virginia coast, and The Daily Press reports on a second offshore turbine now towering over the Atlantic. Meanwhile, a Dominion engineer discusses the company’s huge wind project.

Pipelines and Gas Plants

The biggest recent environmental news in Virginia was Dominion Energy’s decision to abandon the Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP). Here is a sampling of the extensive local, state and national coverage of this announcement:

Utility Giant Kills Gas Pipeline, Sells Assets to Berkshire” [July 6]

SELC’s pipeline team reflects on the path to victory” [July 9]

 “How Buffett’s $10 Billion Pipeline Deal Is Doing Environmental Double Duty Helping Dominion Energy Turn Acres Of Manure Into Clean Power” [July 9]

Dominion’s Post-ACP Clean Energy Awakening: Fact or Fiction?” [July 14]

The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) is not yet canceled, though its developers continue to confront legal obstacles. One in particular relates to a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ permit for waterbody crossing. An environmental hydrologist thinks the MVP permit process illustrates a nationwide failure. As a result of judicial rulings, this process, developed to streamline pipeline projects, might well threaten them.

Here are some stories about the state’s existing natural gas plants:

Two Controversial Virginia Gas Plants Face Increasing Uncertainty, Documents Show

Police academy says new gas pipeline could disrupt training, harm high-speed driving course

 “Over strong opposition, Water Control Board allows Chickahominy Power to tap into Potomac aquifer

Environment

There was good and bad news in the 2020 American Lung Association’s report on air quality for Hampton Roads. For the sixth consecutive year, it has “held firm or improved;” however, the region ranked 169th of 204 areas reporting data, indicating there remains room for improvement.

Hampton Roads also scored a win for migrating birds. This happened after a chorus of Virginians cried “fowl” at the destruction of a migratory nesting site due to tunnel construction. Dogs safely helped arriving birds find their new site, “urging” them to stay away from their old one.

Hampton Roads scored another big win when the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) awarded $100M in funding to water improvement projects.

Virginia, Maryland, and Washington DC are dissatisfied with the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) oversight of the Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan and filed suit; they’re also unhappy with 2 states, New York and Pennsylvania, who aren’t meeting their commitments. The EPA Administrator isn’t “amused” at the “frivolous” lawsuit.

Virginia has taken steps to manage and save its menhaden population in the Chesapeake Bay. The fish is critical to that ecosystem and its commercial fishing industry.

A drier spring may mean that the Chesapeake Bay will have reduced “dead zones” due to, among other things, reduced agricultural runoff.

With the Covid-19 lockdowns worldwide, U.S., carbon emissions are down. Here’s a map showing how much Virginia’s have fallen.

Augusta County now has a protected conservation site, the 350-acre Lyndhurst Ponds Natural Area Preserve. The site protects sinkholes and forests, with the aim of improving water quality, plants, and animals that live there.

The Climate Action Alliance of the Valley (CAAV) is a non-profit, grassroots group in the Central Shenandoah Valley that educates legislators and the public about the implications of the Earth’s worsening climate crisis.